Tweaking Electrolyte Makes Better Lithium-Metal Batteries

New, early-stage research shows adding a small amount of the chemical lithium hexafluorophosphate to a dual-salt, carbonate solvent-based electrolyte can make rechargeable lithium-metal batteries stable, charge quickly and have a high voltage. “A good lithium-metal battery will have the same lifespan as the lithium-ion batteries that power today’s electric cars and consumer electric devices, but also store more energy so we can drive longer in between charges,” said chemist Wu Xu of the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Xu is a corresponding author on a paper published today in the journal Nature Energy. Battery basics Most of the rechargeable batteries used today are lithium-ion batteries, which have two electrodes: one that’s positively charged and contains lithium, and another negative one that’s typically made of graphite. Electricity is generated when electrons flow through a wire that connects the two. To control the electrons, positively charged lithium atoms shuttle from…

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